Pioneering science recently undertaken at the University of Manchester has identified unique properties of the revolutionary 2D material Graphene, which will have significant benefits for the generation and storage of energy, across a very diverse range of applications.

This fundamental research – undertaken in the laboratory of Nobel Prize winner Sir Andre Geim – is now being commercialised by Eksagon Group Ltd, who will exploit three remarkable properties of Graphene:
•    strength (Graphene is stronger than steel);
•    atomic ‘thinness’ (Graphene is only one atom thick);
•    proton ‘permeability’ (Graphene ‘conducts’ thermal protons);

The combination of these three remarkable and unique properties result in an ideal ‘proton exchange membrane’, which will lead to significant enhancements to an array of energy and environmental technologies, including smaller, more durable (and longer life) fuel cells and enhanced performance flow batteries.
No other material or technology has these unique properties, and is thus capable of providing these benefits, which will have dramatic impacts across a wide range of new and existing markets.
Funded by Dr Eli Harari (founder of SanDisk), the company initiated a collaboration with the National Graphene Institute, where it houses its experimental facilities.

Marcelo Lozada together with Thanasis Georgiou during the design phase of Eksagon's lab

Marcelo Lozada together with Thanasis Georgiou during the design phase of Eksagon's lab